Arliss Nancy

Arliss Nancy
While Ft. Collins’ Arliss Nancy celebrate the spirit and mystique of all the best aspects of rock and roll, they also warn that the lifestyle may not be for everyone.
Their latest release, Simple Machines, is a Middle-America, heartland-on-your-sleeve, no frills cautionary tale about the damaging affects of their way of living and a subtle apology to everyone around them watching it unfold.
Combining Thin Lizzy style arpeggio guitar frills, gravel-gargling vocals and a penchant for late nights and regret – the band, comprised of singer/guitarist Cory Call, singer/bassist Kyle “GB” Oppold, guitarist Jason Larson, keyboardist Chris Love and drummer Dominic Buttice –- shakes off sub-genre tags to create anthems to be shouted along with or listened to with quiet and introspective intent.
Simple Machines is the band’s second full-length after 2009′s Dance to Forget. In addition, the band has released two Eps since forming in 2007; 2008′s Rust and Truckstop Roses in 2010.
Each release shows progression and maturity from the previous one – a result that Call says is no accident.
“As far as this album goes it was approached completely different,” he says. “ Not only in the sense of recording but in composition too. Prior to this album Arliss Nancy was based off of a singer/songwriter archetype – that being I would write a song and we would play it. Simple Machines brought more to the table.”
Oppold mimics Call’s sentiment going on to say that the maturation in sound has to do with the band’s decision to strip away previous distinctions and genres.
“The album definitely differs from all the other records,” he says “Our first record was very country heavy, and Truckstop Roses was very alt-country-punk influenced. We tried to keep this new record just rock and roll. I feel like this is the first album that really shows who we are.”
Oppold goes on to say that this is an exciting record for him as it is the first time he contributed songs and sang them. This is a development Call does not have a problem with and cites the Oppold penned song “40s” as his favorite on the album.
“I love that song,” he says. “GB really stepped up and wrote one of the best songs I have ever heard. Something about the way he brings it all back to ‘throwing it all away and drinking 40s with your friends’ – it makes me think of the road – where you only really have your friends and the times you park the van and just get shitty because there is nothing better to do.”
Oppold’s voice is not the only new one that Arliss Nancy fans will hear on Simple Machines. The album is littered with guest vocalists and, right out of the gate on opening track, “The Crease,” two members of the Suburban Home family lend their talents; Micah Schnabel of Two Cow Garage and Lizzie Huffman.
Cory describes the experience of having his fellow label mates on his album as “an honor.” As Oppold explains, the appearances didn’t stop there and, if it was up to him, they would have gotten more.
“I’ve always loved guest appearances,” he says. “ Other than Micah, Shane (Sweeney) and Lizzie Huffman there is Jon Snodgrass (Drag the River), Colin Shane of Spanish Gamble and BJ Buttice of Sour Boy Bitter Girl. This scene is really close here. If I had it my way I’d have all my friends on every record!”
Part of the Arliss Nancy boys keeping their scene tight and family orientated was the decision to sign with Suburban Home Records, a decision that Call said was easy to make.
“Virgil (Dickerson) has been a driving force behind us for a few years now,” Call says. “When he offered us the deal there was no question. We are honored to be part of his family.  I have been borderline obsessed with the bands he has put out for years. Shit, I wanted to be In a Suburban Home band since I was 14.”
Simple Machines and Arliss Nancy fit seamlessly alongside the other Suburban Home Artists, carrying the banner for family, integrity and good ol’ fashioned rock and roll.